Paris Peace Conference

Level: Advanced

The Paris Peace Conference, which met in Versailles in January 1919 to set the terms of the peace after World War I, was arguably the defining diplomatic conference of the twentieth century. It redrew the map of Europe and the Middle East and set the foundation for the interwar era, with achievements and shortcomings that can still be felt in the national borders and regional conflicts down to the present day. The congress hosted more than 27 nations (including the 'Big Four' of France, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and produced no fewer than five major peace treaties, having divided into 52 commissions to prepare international agreements on topics ranging from prisoners of war, to international aviation and undersea cables, to responsibility and reparations for the Great War.

At CUIMUN:

Ahead of the conference’s upcoming 100-year anniversary, and in keeping with this year’s CUIMUN theme of ‘Architects for a Better World’, we will be simulating the Paris Peace Conference as an innovative hybrid committee: in order to bring out the full complexities of an active and ongoing peace congress.

The committee will operate as a standard committee according to usual general assembly procedures, but with two notable differences: first, it will be integrated into our wider Historical Crisis Committee as Crisis Cabinet 4, receiving real-time news updates from 1919 which it can choose to factor into its decision-making; and second, it will have the ability to split into multiple commissions with the power to deliberate as a peace conference more realistically would.

In building on CUIMUN's uniquely strong and distinctive past traditions of historical congresses (including our multi-committee Congress of Westphalia at CUIMUN XIX), we are confident that this committee can assure the very best of diplomatic elegance and grandeur that Cambridge has to offer.

For more information on the Crisis, refer to the page on Historical Crisis.

 Elena Vollmer

Elena Vollmer

Elena is a fourth-year double bachelor student majoring in Economics and Mathematics at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. Since high school she has been passionate about MUN, with awards in historical simulations with Crisis elements at such conferences as Oxford and Harvard. The Paris Peace Conference will be her first time chairing at an international conference.

 Sara Fay

Sara Fay

Sara is a third-year student of International Relations and Modern History student at the University of St Andrews. Born and raised in San Francisco, she received an international school experience beginning with French immersion from the age of five and culminating in the IB program. Having been active in MUN since her first year of high school, she has participated in conferences all over the world. This year she is on Secretariat for SaintMUN. She has extensive experience as both delegate and chair in the UK-style of Crisis, and has also been known to participate in Security Council committees, which provides her a perfect balance for this year's Peace Conference committee. Sara is very involved at St Andrews in activities ranging from the Investment Society to university photography to hosting an on-campus history radio show.

 Ann-Kristin Matthe

Ann-Kristin Matthe

Ann-Kristin is a graduate with a double degree in Public Policy and Human Development from the United Nations University (UNU-MERIT) and the University of Maastricht. A long-time participant and director in MUN, and in particular the old-school continental style of Crisis (at such conferences as Bonn and Milan), she founded a MUN conference in high school and became a trainer of the UN’s MUN rules of procedure (UN4MUN). As a chair and trainer she has been active at events from New York to Seoul, from Abu Dhabi to Oxford and London. She is excited to make CUIMUN her return to MUNing for a final conference.